2010 in review

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Wow.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A Boeing 747-400 passenger jet can hold 416 passengers. This blog was viewed about 6,700 times in 2010. That’s about 16 full 747s.

 

In 2010, there were 43 new posts, not bad for the first year! There were 132 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 69mb. That’s about 3 pictures per week.

The busiest day of the year was July 26th with 786 views. The most popular post that day was CARDIFF EAST EXCLUSIVE: John Dixon reflects on new media’s role in ‘Stupidgate’ .

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were twitter.com, guardian.co.uk, facebook.com, mail.live.com, and iconfactory.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for cardiff east blog, cerys furlong, llanrumney, http://www.cardiffeast.org, and cardiff east wordpress.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

CARDIFF EAST EXCLUSIVE: John Dixon reflects on new media’s role in ‘Stupidgate’ July 2010
3 comments

2

Opposition to new Sainsbury’s store in Rumney Village July 2010
3 comments

3

CARDIFF EAST EXCLUSIVE: Jonathan Morgan AM – Let the people elect Cardiff’s Mayor August 2010
10 comments

4

Llanrumney June 2010

5

Old St. Mellons & Pontprennau July 2010

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LAUNCH OF 4NETWORKING COWBRIDGE AND THE VALE

BUZZ, BUSINESS AND A VERY FINE BREKKIE

Kathryn McTaggart

After weeks of planning, 4Networking  Cowbridge launches at the Duke of Wellington (complete with knight in shining armour!) and there are already businesses booked in from around the country.

4Networking is a different way of doing things. You have three one-to-one appointments at every meeting and members can attend any one of over 200 groups across the country.  Its business networking but informal, fun and a chance to become part of a 20,000 strong network – sharing information, solving problems, building relationships and doing real business

Fancy coming to the very first of many Cowbridge 4Networking events to find what the fuss is about?

Here are the details:

Date: Thursday 7th October 2010
TIME: 8am – 10am
Location: The Duke of Wellington, High Street, Cowbridge, CF71 7AG
Price: Just £10, to cover entry and a cooked or continental breakfast

Places can be booked by emailing  kathryn.mctaggart@family-lawfirm.co.uk.

To find out more about 4Networking, please head over to http://www.4networking.biz/welcome where there’s plenty of information about the club and why it could prove so valuable to your business.

Kathryn specialises in divorce and separation, as well as related financial matters, and has a special interest in private children disputes, including applications by a parent to move with a child to another country. Kathryn is a collaborative lawyer and has worked as a mediator so her approach is always creative rather than adversarial.  She is committed to acknowledging the trauma of separation whilst remaining constructive and forward looking.

You can follow Kathryn McTaggart on:

twitter: @Kat_McTaggart

website: http://www.family-lawfirm.co.uk

blog: http://kathrynmctaggart.wordpress.com/

Peter Watt talks exclusively to CARDIFF EAST, in the last of a four part series, about life behind closed doors in Downing Street during the Labour Government.

Peter Watt was the General Secretary of the Labour Party from January 2006 until November 2007 when he resigned in a blaze of publicity following ‘Donorgate’.

As one of the most senior Labour Party figures Watt was an eye-witness to history as he presided over the transition from Prime Minister Tony Blairto Prime Minister Gordon Brown.

Now in his stunning memoirs entitled Inside Out Watt provides the ultimate insider expose’: a no holds-barred account of the spectacular decline of the most effective party political machine of modern times.

Peter Watt shares a sofa with Nick Clegg, the Deputy Prime Minister.

CARDIFF EAST: How would you explain what ‘Donorgate’ was three years on and your role in it?

PETER WATT: Over a series of years a number of donors gave money to the Party that the Party believed that they were entitled to give and that the Party was entitled to receive.  It was all declared and reported to the Electoral Commission.  But it then transpired that the money was given on behalf of someone else – that meant that we had not reported the donations properly.  The money was ‘clean’ money that the Party was certainly allowed to receive; the person whose money it actually was, was a good man who only wanted to benefit the Party.  No one deliberately deceived anyone, no one personally benefitted – but it looked bad.  I was the Party Official legally responsible for declaring donations and I took the can.  Whether I needed to be condemned as a criminal by the Party Leader and others as a result is a moot point – well I’m pretty clear that I didn’t need to be!  It became a political scandal that was threatening to draw in the Leader and Deputy Leader – I became a useful lightening rod. Continue reading

Peter Watt talks exclusively to CARDIFF EAST, in the third of a four part series, about life behind closed doors in Downing Street during the Labour Government.

Peter Watt was the General Secretary of the Labour Party from January 2006 until November 2007 when he resigned in a blaze of publicity following ‘Donorgate’.

As one of the most senior Labour Party figures Watt was an eye-witness to history as he presided over the transition from Prime Minister Tony Blair to Prime Minister Gordon Brown.

Now in his stunning memoirs entitled Inside Out Watt provides the ultimate insider expose’: a no holds-barred account of the spectacular decline of the most effective party political machine of modern times.

Peter Watt with Tony Blair

As we talk Peter Watt sits in his kitchen with the sounds of his family all around him filling the house. He is a dedicated family man. Watt is brutally honest in his memoirs of the toll that a job at the centre of power took on his family. Perhaps, the most striking passages in the book are those that tell of his father’s final illness and death. In the book he quotes the eulogy he gave for his father David Watt.

And that I think will be Dad’s greatest legacy – he and Mum taught us the value of family, the value of community and valuing others and value of inclusivity. That legacy will live on in every one of his children and grandchildren.”

CARDIFF EAST: How close was ‘the election that never was’ to being called in the autumn of 2007 and do you think that Labour could have won it?

PETER WATT: The Party was operationally ready – leaflets were printed, cars booked, campaign launch planned, funding was in place and staff recruited.  We had even got extra furniture and phone lines.  Across Whitehall Ministers were having leaving Parties.  The election was never formally declared but as far as most people were concerned Gordon called it off rather than decided not to call it.  Would we have won it?  I think so; we’d have been the largest Party at least.  We certainly wouldn’t have suffered our worse result since 1918.

Continue reading

Kathryn McTaggart: The Imerman case – The Man from Del Monte, he say YES!

Kathryn McTaggart

Kathryn McTaggart is a solicitor with national family law specialists Woolley & Co.

Until last month, spouses who discovered information showing their partner was ‘hiding’ money (and not giving the court a true picture of their assets to reach a fair financial settlement) could copy it and put it before the court to help their case. But in the Imerman case, the Court of Appeal decided that those in the weaker position are effectively on their own: their spouse’s privacy is essentially more important than ensuring a fair outcome.

It fair to say that family lawyers are, not to put too fine a point on it, absolutely staggered.

The facts in a nutshell

Mrs Imerman married the ‘Man from Del Monte’ who shared an office with her property tycoon brothers.

When things went ‘pear-shaped’, the brothers locked Mr Imerman out of the office and downloaded somewhere between 250,000 and 1.5 million documents from his computer.

They handed them to their sister’s family lawyers as they believed Mr Imerman had no intention of making full and frank disclosure.

Court of Appeal ruled that Mrs Imerman could not use this information even though she had nothing to do with obtaining it.

Effectively the Court of Appeal said that married couples are entitled to privacy from one another even in relation to what are, after all, matrimonial assets!

What does this mean for divorcing couples (& their lawyers)?

Continue reading

Peter Watt talks exclusively to CARDIFF EAST, in the second of a four part series, about life behind closed doors in Downing Street during the Labour Government.

Peter Watt was the General Secretary of the Labour Party from January 2006 until November 2007 when he resigned in a blaze of publicity following ‘Donorgate’.

As one of the most senior Labour Party figures Watt was an eye-witness to history as he presided over the transition from Prime Minister Tony Blair to Prime Minister Gordon Brown.

Now in his stunning memoirs entitled Inside Out Watt provides the ultimate insider expose’: a no holds-barred account of the spectacular decline of the most effective party political machine of modern times.

Tony Blair and Hazel Blears admire Peter Watt's haircut, July 2006

Continue reading

Peter Watt talks exclusively to CARDIFF EAST, in the first of a four part series, about life behind closed doors in Downing Street during the Labour Government.

Peter Watt was the General Secretary of the Labour Party from January 2006 until November 2007 when he resigned in a blaze of publicity following ‘Donorgate’.

As one of the most senior Labour Party figures Watt was an eye-witness to history as he presided over the transition from Prime Minister Tony Blair to Prime Minister Gordon Brown.

Now in his stunning memoirs entitled Inside Out Watt provides the ultimate insider expose’: a no holds-barred account of the spectacular decline of the most effective party political machine of modern times.

“By the time I had become General Secretary of the Labour Party we were two parties in terms of personality, character and even polling.”

Peter Watt served two Labour Prime Ministers as General Secretary of the Labour Party.

Peter Watt, whilst his wife Vilma is busily organising their children in the background, is remarkably candid about the two Labour Prime Ministers he served as he discusses over the telephone life at the heart of New Labour. Watt would be a daily visitor to Number 10 Downing Street where he would give party political advice to this country’s leadership. In his tenure as General Secretary Watt presided over the much anticipated transition between Blair and Brown and he organised the infamous 2007 ‘election that never was’. Watt was also the man who helped saved the Labour Party from financial oblivion as it was just moments away from being declared bankrupt. Watt reflects that,

“The relationship between Tony and Gordon was difficult and dysfunctional but it was also immensely beneficial for this country.” Continue reading